garage HEATER from old Clothes DRYER gas or electric

Feb 16, 2021
474 066 Views

Free shop furnace with just a little time and effort.
Carbon Monoxide detector with PPM readout Twin pack: amzn.to/37HOQJV
Super flexible natural gas hose w/coupler: amzn.to/3tXJQdT
Shop furnace all ready made and ready for install: amzn.to/37jV4PX
240v ELECTRIC shop heater = to elec dryer: amzn.to/2NB7f4a

CARBON MONOXIDE any concern??????
This is no different than the millions of propane and kerosene shop heaters used daily worldwide. It's actually burns cleaner than those. All of these types don't produce enough CO to register on detectors when properly functioning. Of course a CO detector is always a great idea in case something does go catastrophically wrong. I have tested it for nearly a week running 5+ hours at a time without opening any doors(intentionally trying to confine any potential CO). Tested both on the floor where CO settles and at head height. The highest levels achieved were 13ppm directly in the path of the discharge heat port and 0ppm everywhere else in there shop. The 13ppm was only momentary and likely from initial fire up when the combustion isn't perfect for a split second. Repeated and prolonged tests directly in the discharge path show ZERO. For reference OSHA permits workers to be exposed to 50ppm for 8 hours straight and 200ppm for short intervals. CO detectors usually don't alarm unless they are exposed to 400ppm for over 5minutes straight. This is a SHOP/GARAGE heater and common sense should be used when using any heater that burns fuel or even electric.
COST to occasionally heat shop with different sources of energy for a winter season. Calculated for 25million BTU(1/4 the amount needed to heat an entire home for the winter in Northern USA)
ELECTRIC: $953 (rate $0.13kw)
DIESEL(fuel oil #2): $451 (rate $2.50gallon)
KEROSENE(fuel oil #1): $463 (rate $2.50gallon)
NATURAL GAS: $200 (rate $0.80therm)
PROPANE LPG: $753 (rate $2.75gallon)
WOOD PELLETS: $500 (rate $5 per 40#bag)
WOOD: FREE or $406 (rate$250 4*4*8cord) or $162 (rate$100 4*4*8cord)

THOUGHTS:
So to heat my shop with electric it would cost around $1000 vs the $200 for the Natural Gas. Currently I use Diesel which is cheaper and has more BTU per gallon energy vs Kerosene. I try to get diesel around $2/gallon and stock up, but it's going up. At that rate I could spend around $400-$500 a winter. Cost for me to run black pipe to my garage was around $35 and took an hour or two of my time. The Flexible hose and coupler was around $40. The Natural gas setup and heater should pay for itself in a few months and if I find it's not big enough(20k BTU) to handle the insulated garage I will buy the Mr Heater 50k BTU amzn.to/37jV4PX .

ELECTRIC DRYERS(put out around 20k BTU at 5500watts 240volts)
Some designs are going to be very difficult. The ones with the heating element at the back of the drum are not going to be easy or near impossible(General Electric). The Kenmore/Whirlpool with the cube heating element on the back should be pretty straight forward and easy to work with. The easiest would by the ones with the heating element(like old Maytags) in the burn tube. However, electric heaters are pretty cheap and you can buy a 240V one equal to a dryer for around $100 amzn.to/2NB7f4a

WHICH BROKEN DRYER SHOULD YOU GRAB
-Ones with broken timer controls! You don't really need the timer knob to work. You would just set it and it would go until you stopped it.
-Noisy/banging drum! you are going to take that all out.
-No spin but fan still blows: likely the belt is just broken and that's no problem for us
-Heats but clothes take forever to dry. Likely just lint plugging everything up.
LEAVE BEHIND
-No heat. This is very common with electric and it's just the coil 99% of the time. This is generally $20-40 for the new part. GAS and it's likely the solenoid valves which cost around $20-40.
-BAD CPU computer board with error code: NO forget it, NOT WORTH IT.


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Comments
  • CARBON MONOXIDE any concern?????? This is no different than the millions of propane and kerosene shop heaters used daily worldwide. It's actually burns cleaner than those. All of these types don't produce enough CO to register on detectors when properly functioning. Of course a CO detector is always a great idea in case something does go catastrophically wrong. I have tested it for nearly a week running 5+ hours at a time without opening any doors(intentionally trying to confine any potential CO). Tested both on the floor where CO settles and at head height. The highest levels achieved were 13ppm directly in the path of the discharge heat port and 0ppm everywhere else in there shop. The 13ppm was only momentary and likely from initial fire up when the combustion isn't perfect for a split second. Repeated and prolonged tests directly in the discharge path show ZERO. For reference OSHA permits workers to be exposed to 50ppm for 8 hours straight and 200ppm for short intervals. CO detectors usually don't alarm unless they are exposed to 400ppm for over 5minutes straight. This is a SHOP/GARAGE heater and common sense should be used when using any heater that burns fuel or even electric. Carbon Monoxide detector with PPM readout Twin pack: amzn.to/37HOQJV Super flexible natural gas hose w/coupler: amzn.to/3tXJQdT Shop furnace all ready made and ready for install: amzn.to/37jV4PX 240v ELECTRIC shop heater = to elec dryer: amzn.to/2NB7f4a COST to occasionally heat shop with different sources of energy for a winter season. Calculated for 25million BTU(1/4 the amount needed to heat an entire home for the winter in Northern USA) ELECTRIC: $953 (rate $0.13kw) DIESEL(fuel oil #2): $451 (rate $2.50gallon) KEROSENE(fuel oil #1): $463 (rate $2.50gallon) NATURAL GAS: $200 (rate $0.80therm) PROPANE LPG: $753 (rate $2.75gallon) WOOD PELLETS: $500 (rate $5 per 40#bag) WOOD: FREE or $406 (rate$250 4*4*8cord) or $162 (rate$100 4*4*8cord) THOUGHTS: So to heat my shop with electric it would cost around $1000 vs the $200 for the Natural Gas. Currently I use Diesel which is cheaper and has more BTU per gallon energy vs Kerosene. I try to get diesel around $2/gallon and stock up, but it's going up. At that rate I could spend around $400-$500 a winter. Cost for me to run black pipe to my garage was around $35 and took an hour or two of my time. The Flexible hose and coupler was around $40. The Natural gas setup and heater should pay for itself in a few months and if I find it's not big enough(20k BTU) to handle the insulated garage I will buy the Mr Heater 50k BTU amzn.to/37jV4PX . ELECTRIC DRYERS(put out around 20k BTU at 5500watts 240volts) Some designs are going to be very difficult. The ones with the heating element at the back of the drum are not going to be easy or near impossible(General Electric). The Kenmore/Whirlpool with the cube heating element on the back should be pretty straight forward and easy to work with. The easiest would by the ones with the heating element(like old Maytags) in the burn tube. However, electric heaters are pretty cheap and you can buy a 240V one equal to a dryer for around $100 amzn.to/2NB7f4a WHICH BROKEN DRYER SHOULD YOU GRAB -Ones with broken timer controls! You don't really need the timer knob to work. You would just set it and it would go until you stopped it. -Noisy/banging drum! you are going to take that all out. -No spin but fan still blows: likely the belt is just broken and that's no problem for us -Heats but clothes take forever to dry. Likely just lint plugging everything up. LEAVE BEHIND -No heat. This is very common with electric and it's just the coil 99% of the time. This is generally $20-40 for the new part. GAS and it's likely the solenoid valves which cost around $20-40. -BAD CPU computer board with error code: NO forget it, NOT WORTH IT. STAY UP TO DATE BETWEEN PROJECTS on Social media instagram.com/sixtyfiveford/ facebook.com/sixtyfiveford/ SUPPORT THE CHANNEL? I'm not asking for people to send me anything, but people are awesome and asking how they can support the channel: Zero Cost to you; Watch my videos or buy any items you were going to purchase on Amazon anyways by first clicking through my affiliate link. Costs you nothing but I get a few cents for referring you to Amazon: www.amazon.com/shop/sixtyfiveford OR support the SHOP DOG Buy Ginger a new bone: www.paypal.com/donate/?hosted_button_id=NS699E56WTYHL

    sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford11 days ago
    • Carbon monoxide is a concern, but so is carbon dioxide. Burning anything uses oxygen, which you need for breathing. Not sure a CO detector will also detect CO2. Otherwise, a very cool project and really nice video.

      Richard KRichard K23 hours ago
    • @Scott Schoemann First UL listed means nothing is not required by any one. They are private company that simply makes money off endorsing products. Nearly two weeks running carbon monoxide levels are a perfect zero in the garage.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford3 days ago
    • INCORRECT!!! A natural gas dryer is VENTED outside and DOES produce significant levels of carbon monoxide dependant on the year it was made. this iss why you should not vent gas dryers into the interior of your home to recover heat from them without the use of a UL approved heat exchanger. This is a common cause of CO poisoning in northern states. check with your local fire department for the facts. Electric dryers do not present this issue.

      Scott SchoemannScott Schoemann3 days ago
  • Wow, now if you could run it to a rolling barrel, you could heat your shop and dry some clothes ?๐Ÿค”

    Bob JonesBob JonesHour ago
  • I mean, you could run it through a heat exchanger and still exhaust it outside, just because.

    Bob JonesBob JonesHour ago
  • That air dryer setting would come in *REALLY* handy on those damp, bone chilling days! Even if it didn't add much heat, getting rid of most of the moisture in the air and making it warmer than the air in the shop would still make work more bearable.

    TruckerEnoch 88TruckerEnoch 886 hours ago
  • Good stuff! Thanks!

    Jeff GJeff G13 hours ago
  • Wow

    Chuck PrattChuck Pratt18 hours ago
  • I don't have a shop/garage or a spare dryer but i still watched this entire video for some reason lol. Awesome idea though. You are very resourceful.

    AMDcore1AMDcore1Day ago
    • Hey thanks

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford19 hours ago
  • Great video, and that's a helluva dawg you have there!

    Lazy DLazy DDay ago
    • Thanks LazyD

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford19 hours ago
  • Completely awesome idea. U should just buy some all thread and make brakets underneath and hang it from the ceiling then u wont have to worry about storing it away. Still genius brother. Repurposed the whole machine. You are the youtuber that deserve 1m subs.

    Joshua RiveraJoshua Rivera2 days ago
  • Inspiring!! Thank you for the education / entertainment and inspiration! What's that radiator set up in the background?

    Yogi RamadinYogi Ramadin2 days ago
    • Hey Thanks, I'm glad you liked it. That's the radiator mocked up on my truck, so I can start and run it.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford17 hours ago
  • No heat exchanger = lots water vapor produced.

    flyonbyyaflyonbyya3 days ago
    • Not at all.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford17 hours ago
  • this is genius!!!! bonus it's 110v......keep it coming!!!!

    Nino ReevesNino Reeves3 days ago
    • Thanks, I'm glad you liked it.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford3 days ago
  • Fire it in a vented box outside and send the output pipe and control panel through the wall in you garage and your set. Great video you learn something new everyday ๐Ÿ‘

    supermick83supermick834 days ago
    • I like it!

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford3 days ago
  • Great idea, but why can't you just run it with the vent open as is? I put a valve on my electric vent tube to heat the inside when it's cold and I'm using the dryer anyway.

    sean cooksean cook4 days ago
    • Other than the shear size of a dryer, no reason.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford3 days ago
  • You can get a 30,000 BTU ventless gas wall mounted fireplace with oxygen depletion sensor on Amazon for under $200. They're quite, safer and work when the powers out. Other than that all your info is correct except the "glowy thingy" thats a Hot Surface Ignitor.

    JoeDirtNWCJoeDirtNWC4 days ago
    • Those suck though. They don't move the air around and it only rises. You have to add fans to try and even out the heat which is like blowing a cold fan on yourself in a snowstorm.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford17 hours ago
  • That is sweet.

    Grant W. WhitwamGrant W. Whitwam4 days ago
    • Hey Thanks, I'm glad you liked it.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford17 hours ago
  • My old house the garage had my washer and dryer setup I'm there so I'm the winter te I would disconnect the vent tube from the wall and use it as a heater and plug it back in when it was summer time. Worked great!!

    Firstname Lastname is allowedFirstname Lastname is allowed4 days ago
    • Awesome

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford4 days ago
  • I used the blower only to create a cool suit. Coveralls with a dryer hose stuck in the side pocket inner pocket access hole Pilsberry doe boy style. Works great when its extreme hot and limited work range of motion.

    safety first in texassafety first in texas4 days ago
    • Very cool......

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford3 days ago
  • Just curious, do you have any problems with humidity from cumbustion? And how long does it take to heat up the space to useful temp, like 60 degrees

    Gis DadGis Dad4 days ago
    • I have no issues with humidity. It's the exact same as a propane or kerosene heater when it comes to minimal moisture output. My 20'x22' w/15' ceilings shop is generally at 40-50F the following day so heating back up to 60-65F usually takes around 1 to 1.5 hours. This puts out 20k BTU which is on the smaller side of heaters.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford4 days ago
  • This is awesome. What about using a propane tank instead of connecting to a gas line?

    Jo N ArdJo N Ard4 days ago
    • You need to buy the conversion jet to go from Natural Gas to Propane. It's usually around $15-20. I will say though forced air propane heaters are pretty inexpensive (around $100) vs natural gas of the same design($500). So depending on the cost of the conversion kit it may not be worth it.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford3 days ago
  • Have to laugh, here we are working in workshops that are already 49 degrees C

    v0w1x2v0w1x24 days ago
    • Yeah, this is the last thing you need.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford3 days ago
  • This guy gets it, subscribed.

    libertyn jeopardylibertyn jeopardy5 days ago
    • Hey Thanks, I'm glad you liked it.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford17 hours ago
  • I like it! The bleating safety goat comments are the best part though.

    Brian MeyerBrian Meyer5 days ago
    • Hey Thanks, I'm glad you liked it. Yes they are.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford17 hours ago
  • โ€œGlowy thingyโ€ haha

    BlacKingCoalBlacKingCoal5 days ago
    • Yep.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford16 hours ago
  • Thatโ€™s awesome!!!

    John MonizJohn Moniz5 days ago
    • Thanks, I'm glad you liked it.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford5 days ago
  • Sixtyfivefold: could the dryer be converted to propane?

    hillbilly patriothillbilly patriot6 days ago
    • Yes, virtually every dryer manufacturer sells a Propane conversion jet.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford6 days ago
  • There's a reason that normal gas heaters use a heat exchanger and are not direct fired into the space. This is a bad idea that could kill someone

    Jr JulienJr Julien6 days ago
  • Pretty cool.

    T LT L6 days ago
    • Thanks, I'm glad you liked it.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford5 days ago
  • i thought about this but right it is "humungis " and leaving it in is body make a good heated work bench. Also it less expensive to heat a small space ( with a space heater ) rather than to blow the heat all around the room. Your design may melt the blower housing - looks sort of dangerous to me."There is also an easier way to do this - Just take the drum and belt out of the dryer and you also have a work bench. Thank you

    EurekaRecyclerEurekaRecycler6 days ago
  • Thatโ€™s amazing ๐Ÿคฉ ๐Ÿ‘

    surgicalshooter911surgicalshooter9116 days ago
    • Thanks, I'm glad you liked it.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford5 days ago
  • Very cool man

    Richard LeBlancRichard LeBlanc7 days ago
  • How warm does your shop get ?

    Richard LeBlancRichard LeBlanc7 days ago
    • I've been getting it up to 65F and then I turn it off. 20'x22' shop with 15' peak ceilings.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford5 days ago
  • Youโ€™re way too clever...and smart! ๐Ÿ˜‰

    64bzkbfan64bzkbfan7 days ago
  • Great ๐Ÿ’ก!

    Full Size BroncoFull Size Bronco7 days ago
  • I have put this exact drier out on the curb because the hing broke and the door came off.

    Christopher CopeChristopher Cope7 days ago
  • Holy effing hell...this is AWESOME!

    Broke4speedBroke4speed7 days ago
  • I always love your vids. Thanks bro.

    YouTubeCertifiedYouTubeCertified8 days ago
  • This earned a subscribe

    Sir SnittySir Snitty8 days ago
  • Now I want one lol

    renoreno8 days ago
  • The hvac tech in me is screaming "redtag that sh!t!" We disable units for busted or crack heat exchangers.... that thing doesn't even have one! Lmao great idea for sure.. but definitely gonna cause some headaches or worse after extended use

    Chase ReedChase Reed8 days ago
    • 5 hour tests show 0ppm CO emissions. Startup gives a split second 13ppm and quickly settles to 0ppm

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford8 days ago
  • A gas dryer vents exhaust outside because it is mixed with carbon monoxide you're just venting it in the shop where you breathe? Is anybody else see a problem in that ?

    guns and guitarsguns and guitars8 days ago
  • this was my first video of yours that i saw. and i said to myself what davey k. said. you are a genius. where are you? i want one... pete

    peter hartpeter hart8 days ago
    • Hey Thanks, I'm glad you liked it. I don't offer anything I build on my channel instead I try to provide support for those who build stuff for themselves.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford8 days ago
  • Danger, no ventilation, this monstrosity is going to kill you.

    victor gonzalezvictor gonzalez9 days ago
  • Ya Man !! Hook alil duct work to that dude and instant distributed shop heat !!! Freak,n cool buddy ๐Ÿ‘๐ŸปโœŒ๐Ÿป๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ๐Ÿ’ช๐Ÿป

    Jwy2063Jwy20639 days ago
    • Right on

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford8 days ago
  • Going to have carbon monoxide coming off that thing so unsafe don't recommend it, if you really want to do that recommend a electric dryer over a gas

    Steven OsborneSteven Osborne9 days ago
  • Old dryer ? Sh@$ my dryer are far away older than that ๐Ÿคฃ๐Ÿคฃ

    Eric JalbertEric Jalbert9 days ago
  • Badass!!

    HerreraCamHerreraCam9 days ago
    • Hey Thanks, I'm glad you liked it.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford8 days ago
  • Good for out doors but I would go with electric version for indoors. I love this idea very good video.

    peterisaloft PCpeterisaloft PC9 days ago
  • Idiot just poisoned himself with carbon monoxide.

    Model Railroad Back Shop with Roger KujawaModel Railroad Back Shop with Roger Kujawa9 days ago
  • I did this 18 years ago. Never seen anybody do it? I'm sure many people have done this before ๐Ÿ˜‚

    not surenot sure9 days ago
  • Wait...so you're pumping Carbon Monoxide into your shop? This is why we shake our heads when we show up to your house on an aid call. Our department sees this stupid stuff every winter, people heating their homes with gas powered devices that are not intended for indoor use. There's a reason that a dryer vents to the outside air.

    S LS L10 days ago
  • Wiley coyote sheer genius

    AppleGuy670AppleGuy67010 days ago
    • ACME heater!

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford10 days ago
  • I make vinyl decals. Send me a drawing and I will make it happen at no cost to you.

    Paul VidrinePaul Vidrine10 days ago
  • However after watching the entire video you might wana reconsider letting your dog put its head in a rotating dryer with its collar on lol. Good video minus that whole animal about to get fucked up part lol.

    Klin JohnsonKlin Johnson10 days ago
    • I got 0 problems with it besides the collar being on cuz it coulda got caught up in the dryer somehow lol. To each his own though. Keep up the good videos!

      Klin JohnsonKlin Johnson10 days ago
    • Ginger is very well trained and was given a person command to not. It looks from a outsiders view as wild but the entire situation was completely controlled and a simple training exercise. It was practiced before hand off camera with a stationary and moving drum.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford10 days ago
  • Jesus fucking Christ... THATS GENIUS GG!

    Klin JohnsonKlin Johnson10 days ago
    • Thanks, I'm glad you liked it.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford10 days ago
  • I lost it with the dog catching tennis balls at the end :D

    sibirtysibirty10 days ago
    • Hey Thank!

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford10 days ago
  • That sooooo fucking dope๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿฟ๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿฟ๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿฟ๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿฟ๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿฟ๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿฟ๐Ÿ™Œ๐Ÿฟ

    Ronne DavisRonne Davis10 days ago
    • Thanks, I'm glad you liked it.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford10 days ago
  • This thing is dangerous. Unless your garage is well ventilated, you will fill your garage full of CO and CO2

    Kevin GastKevin Gast10 days ago
    • @sixtyfiveford I see where you a coming from but all those direct combustion heaters like the kerosene/diesel heaters warn you about using them only in well ventilated locations like a worksite. Many garages are older and have a decent amount of ventilation to make it somewhat ok. Newer construction and building codes, especially with attached garages, will build up co and co2 and not have enough airflow to replace the oxygen that is consumed. This comment applies to any heater the burns fuel and donโ€™t vent out the combustion air. Your heater idea will work for some but you should have a disclaimer and explain the potential safety concerns. Common sense is no longer so common any more. I have used both propane and diesel forced air heaters and have felt the symptoms of high co / low oxygen when working in my personal garage that is pretty drafty. So just because you havenโ€™t had issues, doesnโ€™t mean the danger for others wonโ€™t present itself.

      Kevin GastKevin Gast10 days ago
    • CARBON MONOXIDE any concern?????? This is no different than the millions of propane and kerosene shop heaters used daily worldwide. It's actually burns cleaner than those. All of these types don't produce enough CO to register on detectors when properly functioning. Of course a CO detector is always a great idea in case something does go catastrophically wrong. I have tested it for nearly a week running 5+ hours at a time without opening any doors(intentionally trying to confine any potential CO). Tested both on the floor where CO settles and at head height. The highest levels achieved were 13ppm directly in the path of the discharge heat port and 0ppm everywhere else in there shop. The 13ppm was only momentary and likely from initial fire up when the combustion isn't perfect for a split second. Repeated and prolonged tests directly in the discharge path show ZERO. For reference OSHA permits workers to be exposed to 50ppm for 8 hours straight and 200ppm for short intervals. CO detectors usually don't alarm unless they are exposed to 400ppm for over 5minutes straight. This is a SHOP/GARAGE heater and common sense should be used when using any heater that burns fuel or even electric.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford10 days ago
  • Damn that a good idea! Thinking of making one just to get the brain moving.

    Ralph TorrezRalph Torrez10 days ago
    • Thanks, I'm glad you liked it.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford10 days ago
  • Gas dryer!!! Don't think I've ever seen one of those, pretty sure they're all electric in the UK.

    Livi 120Livi 12010 days ago
    • Didn't the UK and or Europe used to have gas refrigerators in the 70's

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford10 days ago
  • Nice Job and for a freebie dryer actually pretty cool or should I say pretty hot! - LOL

    D.J. RadioRoy SpinnerD.J. RadioRoy Spinner10 days ago
    • Hey Thanks.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford10 days ago
  • I need one how much?

    Xavier Xanitois BeyXavier Xanitois Bey10 days ago
    • Free, you just have to find the dryer and do it yourself.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford10 days ago
  • I have a question about the tire stuff you used is that better than slime and could you do a video explaining the difference between the two so I can get a better idea of witch one to use thanks for reading keep the videos coming

    Adam MosherAdam Mosher10 days ago
    • I assume you watched the video on the Tireject where I put it into 4 ATV tires? Why is better: The main reason is because it watery and flows everywhere. It is liquid rubber so when it solidifies it's essentially an innertube inside your tire. The Slime is clumpy and seams to dry up after a year and some leaks reappear requiring more Slime. It does work good just not nearly as good as the Tireject.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford10 days ago
  • Super handy. And no profanity. I subbed.

    girl_next_doorablegirl_next_doorable10 days ago
    • Thanks for the sub!

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford10 days ago
  • Looks like a solution.

    Mark StandishMark Standish11 days ago
  • Man, I'd love to see one done for an electric one.

    bstricklerbstrickler11 days ago
  • Thereโ€™s a reason gas dryers are vented to the outdoors and why salamander heaters are not for enclosed spaces.

    bossman429bossman42911 days ago
  • Great fun Clever

    Dale CarsonDale Carson11 days ago
    • Glad you enjoyed it

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford11 days ago
  • Awesome!

    Joe YoungJoe Young11 days ago
    • Glad you think so!

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford11 days ago
  • That is really cool! What are you going to make from the stainless steel drum?

    42lookc42lookc11 days ago
    • @sixtyfiveford Some kind of tumbler/polisher? A centrifugal wood pellet dust cleaner? A 'cone of silence' type weld splatter shield? I doubt you have the proper licensing, so building a satellite is probably out of the question. A cement mixer? A rotary dog washer?

      42lookc42lookc11 days ago
    • I'm not sure yet. I fire drum is obvious but I'm still mulling ideas around in my head. Do you have any ideas?

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford11 days ago
  • Outstanding job!!!!

    TheModelmaker123TheModelmaker12311 days ago
    • Thank you!

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford10 days ago
  • cool!

    Rocky WrightRocky Wright11 days ago
    • Hey Thanks.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford10 days ago
  • Okay, I am impressed. Brilliant idea.

    GT1ManGT1Man11 days ago
    • Thanks!

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford10 days ago
  • Awesome idea

    Scott AScott A11 days ago
    • Thanks a lot

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford11 days ago
  • Replying to your comment about carbon monoxide. I was not worried about carbon monoxide I was worried about burning up all the oxygen in the space, itโ€™s a common thing.

    Duncan MillarDuncan Millar11 days ago
    • I agree, but they go hand in hand. The more oxygen that is removed the worse the burn. That leads to an incomplete burn and high CO output. So people will die from CO far before reduced Oxygen.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford11 days ago
  • This is the best video I have ever seen! You are a inspiration my man!

    JrdJrd11 days ago
    • Glad you enjoyed it!

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford11 days ago
  • Good project, better than sending an old dryer to the landfill (at least parts of it). The steel base looks galvanized. Need to be careful cutting and welding galvanized steel as the fumes are toxic.

    zealous-tinkererzealous-tinkerer11 days ago
    • The fumes actually aren't deadly or permanently harmful, it's more of a wives tale blown out of proportion. Welding galvanized for hours has the possibility to give you "welders flu"/Metal Fume Fever. However it takes HOURS and HOURS of inhaling the fumes. There are no long term side affects and it just feels like you went to the gym the day before and lasts about 24hours. Then it's gone and that's it. No build up in the blood stream, body etc. There are tons of medical studies on it and all come to the same benign conclusion. OSHA has no special requirements for welding Zinc coated metals and gives the exact same recommendation for welding/cutting any metal as the dangers are the same.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford11 days ago
  • I missed the part where your wife finds you on the floor from carbon monoxide poisoning.

    HereFishyFishyHereFishyFishy11 days ago
    • This is no different than the millions of propane and kerosene shop heaters used daily worldwide. It's actually burns cleaner than those. All of these types don't produce enough CO to register on detectors when properly functioning. Of course a CO detector is always a great idea in case something does go catastrophically wrong. I have tested it for nearly a week running 5+ hours at a time without opening any doors(intentionally trying to confine any potential CO). Tested both on the floor where CO settles and at head height. The highest levels achieved were 13ppm directly in the path of the discharge heat port and 0ppm everywhere else in there shop. The 13ppm was only momentary and likely from initial fire up when the combustion isn't perfect for a split second. Repeated and prolonged tests directly in the discharge path show ZERO. For reference OSHA permits workers to be exposed to 50ppm for 8 hours straight and 200ppm for short intervals. CO detectors usually don't alarm unless they are exposed to 400ppm for over 5minutes straight.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford11 days ago
  • Pretty cool idea and video ! It seams to me that most washer dryers are built by one place and rebadged for different names

    Craig MonteforteCraig Monteforte11 days ago
    • That's pretty much everything made these days. Paint it a different color, put some different stickers and it's a completely different product.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford11 days ago
  • Someone who actually has a plasma cutter. Why does so many people think that a 4-1/2" cut-off wheel is the only way to cut anything? That's all you ever see in any DIY video.

    1SixpenceFan1SixpenceFan11 days ago
    • It makes cutting odd shaped things a breeze.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford11 days ago
  • I would definitely have a good CO has tester nearby. Nice job though.

    jorge fernandezjorge fernandez11 days ago
    • Every garage/home should have a CO detector no matter what. This is no different than the millions of propane and kerosene shop heaters used daily worldwide. It's actually burns cleaner than those. All of these types don't produce enough CO to register on detectors when properly functioning. Of course a CO detector is always a great idea in case something does go catastrophically wrong. I have tested it for nearly a week running 5+ hours at a time without opening any doors(intentionally trying to confine any potential CO). Tested both on the floor where CO settles and at head height. The highest levels achieved were 13ppm directly in the path of the discharge heat port and 0ppm everywhere else in there shop. The 13ppm was only momentary and likely from initial fire up when the combustion isn't perfect for a split second. Repeated and prolonged tests directly in the discharge path show ZERO. For reference OSHA permits workers to be exposed to 50ppm for 8 hours straight and 200ppm for short intervals. CO detectors usually don't alarm unless they are exposed to 400ppm for over 5minutes straight. This is a SHOP/GARAGE heater and common sense should be used when using any heater that burns fuel or even electric.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford11 days ago
  • Cool idea! After reading all the comments about CO and exhaust gasses, I only have one thing to point out. Everyone's seems focused on what the heater puts out but not what it's taking in...oxygen. (among other things) I've been to many a garage party heated by gas or propane heaters. I would say that there are common sense concerns, but nothing to get too worked up about. The exhaust gasses have never been an issue. The amounts just aren't enough to be harmful unless I suppose you were to seal the room airtight and run the heater nonstop for days. That being said, In my experience, the worst case scenario would be a low oxygen environment which isn't harmful unless it's for a prolonged period of time and is easily remedied by cracking a door for a minute.

    MongoLloydMongoLloyd11 days ago
  • I dub thee, "Frankenheater"! But ease up on the professional lingo, Professor! You lost me at "glowy-thingy"...

    James NorrisJames Norris11 days ago
  • I am new to this, is any concerns about carbon monoxide from the burning natural gas. Not a criticism just wanted to ask as my garage is smaller and I have to guess I will need to leave doors open so the carbon monoxide is not a concern.?

    KB6 LCWKB6 LCW12 days ago
    • It's no different than the millions of propane and kerosene shop heaters used daily worldwide. They don't produce enough CO to register on detectors when properly functioning. Of course a CO detector is always a great idea in case something does go wrong. I have tested it for nearly a week running up to 5 hours at a time without opening any doors. Tested both on the floor where CO settles and at head height. The highest levels achieved were 13ppm directly in the path of the discharge heat port and 0ppm everywhere else in there shop. The 13ppm was likely from initial fire up when the combustion isn't perfect for a split second as repeated and prolonged tests at the same area show ZERO during the heat cycle. For reference OSHA permits workers to be exposed to 50ppm for 8 hours straight and 200ppm for short intervals.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford11 days ago
  • Dude. I *amazed* at what I've just watched. This. Is. Genius.

    Keith WoodcrestKeith Woodcrest12 days ago
  • Great build How do you modify the door switch?

    Baron von DealsBaron von Deals12 days ago
    • Just connect the two wires.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford11 days ago
  • This is really neat but I hope you don't die from carbon monoxide poisoning. I would definitely recommend using an electric dryer or incorporating a heart exchanger. ๐Ÿคทโ€โ™‚๏ธ๐Ÿคทโ€โ™‚๏ธ๐Ÿคทโ€โ™‚๏ธ

    Aaron McCullyAaron McCully12 days ago
    • Well, with all due respect, I think it's ignorant to burn natural gas indoors. ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿป๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿป๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿป

      Aaron McCullyAaron McCully12 days ago
    • @Aaron McCully Because people are ignorant and don't know how to adjust the little air meter on the back. They just assume everything is perfect out of the box.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford12 days ago
    • @sixtyfiveford I've sat next to many kerosene heaters in my days and stood up feeling pretty light headed ๐Ÿ˜‰๐Ÿ˜‰๐Ÿ˜‰

      Aaron McCullyAaron McCully12 days ago
    • It's no different than the millions of propane and kerosene shop heaters used daily worldwide. They don't produce enough CO to register on detectors when properly functioning. Of course a CO detector is always a great idea in case something does go wrong. I have tested it for nearly a week running up to 5 hours at a time without opening any doors. Tested both in the floor where CO settles and at head height. The highest levels achieved were 13ppm directly in the path of the discharge great port and 0ppm everywhere else in there shop. The 13ppm was likely from initial fire up when the combustion isn't perfect for a split second as repeated and prolonged tests at the same area show ZERO. For reference OSHA permits workers to be exposed to 50ppm for 8 hours straight and 200ppm for short intervals.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford12 days ago
  • I would have put both the fan and heater element exhausts parallel to each other and connect them with a Y. That way the blower fan doesn't take all the toll from the heat

    Vamp ArionVamp Arion12 days ago
    • It doesn't take all the heat. The air ports on the back and around the air inlet of the fan pull in and 50% cool air to mix with the hot air.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford12 days ago
  • Hi i really like what you did with that dryer can is it the same for a electric dryer

    hb bastardhb bastard12 days ago
  • I really like your clever mind fella. Job well done for sure. What I would like to see is an electric garage heater. Maybe you could make one happen Sir ??? Thanks

    Victory FirstVictory First12 days ago
    • @sixtyfiveford First thank you for responding to my question about the video. Second I know electric heat is really not efficient. But maybe you could make different type of wire for the heater or try using a different layout of wire shape just might make this happen. Where I am at gas is not really that cheap either. My neighbor burns wood to supplement his gas heater because the price has gone up close to triple from when he first started using that heat type. Peace

      Victory FirstVictory First5 days ago
    • One of the reasons I didn't make an electric one is mainly due to electricity being the most inefficient and expensive way to heat something. You can also pick up electric heaters for around $15.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford12 days ago
  • Hi, Iโ€™m not sure if it has been mentioned or not but the gas dryer needs to be vented outside just like a gas water heater. Carbon monoxide could build up in the shop. Electric would be my preference. Great idea though!

    PlumsixPakPlumsixPak12 days ago
    • It's no different than the millions of propane and kerosene shop heaters used daily worldwide. They don't produce enough CO to register on detectors when properly functioning. Of course a CO detector is always a great idea in case something does go wrong.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford12 days ago
  • Absolutely GENIUS. But....that dryer was worth more to sell on Craigslist and just buy a heater lol. But point is that it can be done.

    geoffrey walkergeoffrey walker12 days ago
  • Been using a electric since chimney fire, mornings it helps to raise main floor old farm house to livable temperatures, Cheers and Peace Out

    Granite Ridge GreensGranite Ridge Greens12 days ago
  • Thatโ€™s one of the coolest things Iโ€™ve seen in a while. Cool as hell man.

    Rod PottsRod Potts12 days ago
    • Thanks man

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford12 days ago
  • friggin brilliant

    William HippWilliam Hipp12 days ago
    • Hey thanks, I'm glad you like it

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford12 days ago
  • Nice

    Cecil ClydeCecil Clyde12 days ago
    • Hey thanks, I'm glad you like it

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford12 days ago
  • Great dryer hack thanks

    The Plow GuysThe Plow Guys12 days ago
    • Hey thanks, I'm glad you like it

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford12 days ago
  • That thing is so awesome. Great work !

    Michael MurphyMichael Murphy12 days ago
    • Hey thanks, I'm glad you like it

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford12 days ago
  • I think I'll play it safe and just buy a space heater.

    Pete RabagoPete Rabago12 days ago
  • It's vented outside normally for a reason, Especially gas CO2. Elec yea you could probably get by with but it'd have to be clean. Free from anything it could ignite but gas CO someone could die. Not saying it's a bad shop heater either way I'd just rather you go over the points that someone on here could get hurt by... Thanks for the vid but people please do your homework before attempting something like this.. Again no disrespect I'd just advise. I've been doing HVACR practically since I was born and my biggest fear was always leaving someone with a CO2 issue I had missed. Again no disrespect this is just a FYI...... THanks

    D HD H12 days ago
    • It's no different than the millions of propane and kerosene shop heaters used daily worldwide. They don't produce enough CO to register on detectors when properly functioning. Of course a CO detector is always a great idea in case something does go wrong. I have tested it for nearly a week running up to 5 hours at a time without opening any doors. Tested both on the floor where CO settles and at head height. The highest levels achieved were 13ppm directly in the path of the discharge heat port and 0ppm everywhere else in there shop. The 13ppm was likely from initial fire up when the combustion isn't perfect for a split second as repeated and prolonged tests at the same area show ZERO during the heat cycle. For reference OSHA permits workers to be exposed to 50ppm for 8 hours straight and 200ppm for short intervals.

      sixtyfivefordsixtyfiveford12 days ago
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